Author Topic: THE LAST MAN STANDING!!  (Read 1082 times)

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Offline NEWROAD

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THE LAST MAN STANDING!!
« on: April 07, 2010, 11:54:11 AM »
"The last man standing"
AYUSH KHADKA 
 
MAHENDRA,JEEVAN,RAJENDRA,KRISHNA PRASAD,KALYAN AND SALYAN KHADGI.
APR 02 -
Sankata Football Club is battling relegation this season. At the end of the first leg, the club is second from bottom with just six points in its kitty. The situation is appalling; one of the country’s oldest football clubs is heading to the gallows.

As the club tries to swim ashore in the second leg, there is one player in the squad who feels the pressure more than all the other members of the squad combined.

For, Salayan Khadgi is not just a defender in the club, but has a long family history to protect.

Salayan is the seventh, and the last, member of the Khadgi family to have represented the club. The Khadgi family, originally from Tebahal in New Road, are probably the only family in Nepal to have produced so many Division A footballers, and it wouldn’t be an assumption when one says Salayan has more than just the club’s future on his mind.

It all started with Salayan’s father Krishna Prasad Khadgi, who was the club’s goalkeeper during its initial days after Sankata was founded in 1951. Septuagenarian Krishna Prasad talks about his younger days like they happened yesterday; starting from the time he would kick anything that was round, to the soup his father used to prepare for the whole club after practice. “My father was a football buff. Though he did not play the game as a regular, he used to encourage us by helping in every way he could.” 

It’s not unusual for a younger sibling to emulate his or her elder sibling. And so, Krishna’s younger brother Jiwan and Kiran both followed him into the beautiful game. Jiwan captained Sankata for many years and even went on to represent the national team in the 70’s. Then, Jiwan also became the vice-president of the All Nepal Football Association (ANFA) in the mid 90’s.

But for Kiran, it was a sad, and different, story. He never made it as a player due to his fitness levels, but his love for the game did not die at that. In what could be a brilliant film by itself, Kiran has established himself as the greatest fan of Nepali football. Even today, he is a regular visitor to the Dashrath Stadium, making sure he watches as many matches of the league as possible. His acquaintances describe the man as the sole ‘spectator of Nepali football’. Acknowledging his love for the game, ANFA has even provided him a free entry to all games since many years.

The three brothers made their mark on Nepali football, albeit in different ways. Then, it was the younger generation’s turn to step in their fathers’ boots. They, in fact, outgrew the boots, with five Khadgis from the second generation representing the club.

The first among the second generation was Mohan, the eldest son of Krishna. Mohan, currently in the U.S., played for Sankata from 1979 to 1995. Rajendra, his younger brother, accompanied his brother on the field from 1985 to 1999. Mohan, third son of Krishna, followed immediately after, but his brother Keshav could not continue the trend because of an injury. Still, Keshav follows his uncle to all of Sankata’s games, and despite his football dreams being over, he remains as connected to the game as any of his siblings.

The next in line was Kalyan Khadgi, who also had a brief stint with Sankata’s local rival club New Road Team before retiring in 2006. Salayan, the youngest son of Krishna, is the last from the family in the league. After he retires--which he says will take some time in coming—there will be a big void as the third generation still has a long way before they can make it to the big stage.

Salayan says he wants to train his nephews to be footballers, but he is not sure if they want to become one. “I want them to play for Sankata and keep the family trend alive, but I am not sure if they want to become footballers like us,” he says.

“Football runs in our blood,” adds Salyan, who had thought of quitting the game two years ago to focus more on his family business of selling sewing machines. Instead, he desisted, and today, he vows to play two more years for Sankata. “I left football for a while, but whenever I saw my friends kicking around, I could not stop myself from joining them,” he says.

The Khadgi family has been synonymous with Sankata’s existence. But with the club battling relegation, Salayan obviously feels the weight of two generations on him.

“We have 11 games remaining and we will not let this (relegation) happen. Individually, Sankata is one of the best but it’s unfortunate that we have not been able to click as a team. We will survive, though,” says Salayan with a determination.

Still, after Salayan’s retirement, it will be difficult to imagine the Sankata starting 11 without a Khadgi on the teamroll.



 
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 10:00:05 AM by NEWROAD »
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Offline ewangeorge77

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Re: THE LAST MAN STANDING!!
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2012, 05:59:17 PM »
Septuagenarian Krishna Prasad talks about his younger days like they happened yesterday; starting from the time he would kick anything that was round, to the soup his father used to prepare for the whole club after practice. “My father was a football buff. Though he did not play the game as a regular, he used to encourage us by helping in every way he could.” 

Offline ewangeorge77

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Re: THE LAST MAN STANDING!!
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2012, 05:04:39 PM »
Jiwan captained Sankata for many years and even went on to represent the national team in the 70’s. Then, Jiwan also became the vice-president of the All Nepal Football Association (ANFA) in the mid 90’s.

Offline ewangjoni

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Re: THE LAST MAN STANDING!!
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2012, 04:41:49 PM »
Salayan is the seventh, and the last, member of the Khadgi family to have represented the club. The Khadgi family, originally from Tebahal in New Road, are probably the only family in Nepal to have produced so many Division A footballers, and it wouldn’t be an assumption when one says Salayan has more than just the club’s future on his mind.

Offline jonibeet

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Teak Wood Outdoor Furniture: A Best Buy
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2012, 01:52:55 PM »
Wood furniture is best placed outside our homes to make a great impression on some things that might refer to elegance. A lot of good homes have one particular site and that is their garden with the sophisticated outdoor furniture like wood benches. And one of the best enough woods that should be made for that bench should be teak wood. The material is being used widely in decades and has been named the strongest wood for furniture ever been built since then.

Offline treebell23

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Re: THE LAST MAN STANDING!!
« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2012, 01:27:39 PM »
His acquaintances describe the man as the sole ‘spectator of Nepali football’. Acknowledging his love for the game, ANFA has even provided him a free entry to all games since many years.

Offline delroy.deitra

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History of the Modern Mattress
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2012, 04:56:34 PM »
Since the beginning of mankind and the advent of ancient civilizations,? ?people have been desperately seeking the best way to get a comfortable night’s sleep.? ?The search for an answer to this question began with the ancient Egyptians, who discovered that elevating pallets off the ground and placing a mattress [stuffed with palm bows] on top of it c?reated a surface that could help a person rest well at night.?

Offline rochzyta

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Don't panic if your fridge is on the fritz--call on appliance repair services to see if you can get it back in working order again. If it's beyond repair, contact your local metal salvage company to remove and dispose of it in a responsible way.

Offline jacobzenon

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Tis the Season for Flower Girl Dresses and Children's Formal Wear
« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2012, 03:52:17 PM »
Spring is just around the corner, which means it's the season for children's formal wear. Weddings call for flower girl dresses and boy's tuxedos, as well as for First Communion dresses and boy's suits. What's in this season? Read on to find out!

Offline teofiltekla

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Building a site to specialise in bodystockings
« Reply #9 on: May 03, 2012, 02:19:20 PM »
There are many lingerie e-commerce sites. Lingerie, probably more than most other items of clothing, is ideally suited for the internet. For instance, there are many men who prefer buying lingerie items for their partners using the anonymity of the internet as opposed to publicly perusing isles of lingerie in a high street store.

Offline yush101

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Re: THE LAST MAN STANDING!!
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2012, 12:15:05 AM »
Definition ... The most common unsupervised use of antihistamines in terms of volume and percentage of the total is perhaps in parallel to the ...

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