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Offline soiamd

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Metal Craft
« on: July 25, 2008, 07:50:58 AM »
In the bazaar street between Durbar Square and Asan Tol, generation-old shops sell fine metalwares made in Patan, or in Chainpur and Bhojpur in eastern Nepal.

Years from now, as you look back on your time in Nepal, what images will you remember?

For some, it will be a Nepali woman, square-shouldered, dressed in red, holding a large brass water jar on her hip; for others, the bazaar in old Kathmandu, a river of people flowing by little shops overflowing with bangles, colorful cloth and shining metalwares; still others will remember the small temples scattered along the streets, their brass portals glowing in the light of butter lamps.

For seven centuries, since the artistic flowering of the early Malla period, copper, brass, and bronze have been shaped into graceful forms of gods and goddesses, pounded into panels of animals and flowers, and cast into the simple vessels that shine in the warm, dark kitchens of Nepali homes.

In the bazaar street between Durbar Square and Asan Tol, generation-old shops sell fine metalwares made in Patan, or in Chainpur and Bhojpur in eastern Nepal. Most metalwares are new, and of consistently good quality. Quality and cost are determined by the proper mixing of metals, the casting, and the finishing.

Pure and proportionate mixtures for bronze and brass are difficult to assess by eye?the reputation of the metal worker is the best assurance. Unskilled casting leaves pits and thin spots. Each piece should be carefully examined for patches, which may discolor over time. Finishing, polishing, and the refinement of details like floral patterns and faces take a skilled hand and a lot of time. Compare different pieces, and you?ll soon be able to distinguish fine from crude quality.

Older pieces are found in the open market beside Durbar Square, in shops along Durbar Marg, and in Bhaktapur. A dark, venerable appearance doesn?t mean a piece is old. Feel the underside of the piece. It will be smooth with time and use, sharp if it?s new. To take pieces over one hundred years old out of the country, you must get permission from the Department of Archaeology. Many shops and shipping agencies will be glad to provide information and assistance.

Walk through the bazaar to Kel Tol, a small square where a little temple is festooned with red and black hair tassels and a wall of hats is on display. In a large courtyard, behind a Buddha statue on a carved pillar, is the temple of Seto Machhendranath, the deity of compassion. Wind through the diminutive chaityas up to the temple, where the richly-dressed deity sits in candlelight behind repouss? brass portals. Look up at the half-moon toranas above the doors, delicately beaten into flowers and beasts, and you will see raw holes in the metal where figures of the gods have been torn out. Some exquisite old metalwork is for sale in Kathmandu, but it is part of Nepal?s heritage and should not be exported. A few images are left on the toranas? a Tara holding a lotus, with a protective band of steel around her waist.

Outside in the bazaar, the metalwares travel (as they have for centuries) from shop to home and often to distant lands. In the Nepali home, there is a vast array of plates and pots and lamps, polished with woodash to a gentle luster. In every room and washing place, you will see the karuwa, a water pitcher with a stubby spout.

When the family sits down for their rice, the amkhora or water jar, will stand beside the round dal cups, called kachaura, and the beaten brass dinner plates. The amkhora and the kachaura are often decorated with ancient designs?medallions of Krishna, Buddha, or peacocks set in elaborate floral patterns.

On religious and formal occasions, raksi or Nepali wine flows in many homes. Guests are served raksi in small, finely worked wine cups from the anti, a tall decanter with a long curving spout and a metal lid adorned with a bird. At some wedding feasts, the grace of the shy bride is tested before the husband?s family?lifting the anti high in the air, she must pour wine into the tiny cups, not spilling a drop.

In casual times, local beer called chang is drunk from the heavy ?singing bowl,? found in every metal shop and souvenir stand. Many are from Assam, and despite their festive use, their delightful sound has brought them to the quiet rooms of countless Western meditators.

In the kitchen, where metalwares have changed little in hundreds of years, the paradigm of simple, graceful design is the traditional round-bottomed rice pot. A unique variation is the kan baddhu or ?ear pot,? a heavy vessel with two large metal loops or ears at its rim and a large loop on its lid. The handle of a brass ladle is slipped through the loops and twisted. The lid is firmly closed?a Nepali pressure cooker.

Though its temple may be on a distant hillside, the family?s personal deity also has a home at the family altar, in the kitchen or the pantry room. Here, in daily puja, they offer food, water, flowers, and colored powders to their deity. The gods? and goddesses? vessels are often small versions of household wares tiny karuwas and antis for pouring water or wine.

Light is offered in minute brass butter lamps or in elaborate sukundas. The sukunda is a composite piece, a shallow lamp-dish attached to a sacred oil pot. Five serpent deities rise behind the oil pot like a hand. Behind the lamp is a figure of Ganesh, the elephant-headed god. A little stand with two or three coin-sized cups holds vermilion and other colored powders, and a fine beaten copper dish, perhaps made by the Tamrakars of Patan, holds rice, sweets, and flowers.

In Nepal, gods and humans, beauty and utility mingle freely. For seven hundred years, metals from these hills have travelled to China, India, and Tibet. In a month or two, perhaps you like the medieval Chinese pilgrim, will arrive at your home, open your satchel, and present your family with a fine anti or amkhora, cast in the workshops of Patan or the cottages of Chainpur. And years from now, that piece will bring to life your vision of Nepal.


source : nepal traveller

Offline ń?ŰģĦŢŷĶĭĎ

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2008, 01:17:04 PM »
good post

Offline $ooooooooN@

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2008, 09:35:07 AM »
Nice Info.

Tnx Soi Bro!!!

Offline Eastern Media Solution

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #3 on: August 11, 2008, 12:33:42 PM »
Nice Info.

Tnx Soi Bro!!!

:hahaha:
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Offline ReSi

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2008, 10:32:54 AM »
 :Surprised:
 :lightning:
तपाईहरू सँग मिलेर खुशी बाड्‌न चाहन्‍छु
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Offline Eastern Media Solution

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #5 on: August 13, 2008, 11:04:14 AM »
Anythin wron ? :P
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Offline ReSi

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #6 on: August 13, 2008, 02:08:54 PM »
:no no no:
तपाईहरू सँग मिलेर खुशी बाड्‌न चाहन्‍छु
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Offline Eastern Media Solution

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2008, 03:19:49 PM »
GReat
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Offline Isabella8688

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2012, 11:33:37 AM »

Thanks you for the post.

Offline ewangeorge77

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #9 on: March 21, 2012, 05:57:27 PM »
In the bazaar street between Durbar Square and Asan Tol, generation-old shops sell fine metalwares made in Patan, or in Chainpur and Bhojpur in eastern Nepal. Most metalwares are new, and of consistently good quality. Quality and cost are determined by the proper mixing of metals, the casting, and the finishing.

Offline ewangeorge77

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2012, 05:02:54 PM »
Each piece should be carefully examined for patches, which may discolor over time. Finishing, polishing, and the refinement of details like floral patterns and faces take a skilled hand and a lot of time.

Offline ewangjoni

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2012, 04:37:01 PM »
In the bazaar street between Durbar Square and Asan Tol, generation-old shops sell fine metalwares made in Patan, or in Chainpur and Bhojpur in eastern Nepal. Most metalwares are new, and of consistently good quality. Quality and cost are determined by the proper mixing of metals, the casting, and the finishing.

Offline jonibeet

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #12 on: March 31, 2012, 01:42:19 PM »
In the bazaar street between Durbar Square and Asan Tol, generation-old shops sell fine metalwares made in Patan, or in Chainpur and Bhojpur in eastern Nepal.

Years from now, as you look back on your time in Nepal, what images will you remember?

For some, it will be a Nepali woman, square-shouldered, dressed in red, holding a large brass water jar on her hip; for others, the bazaar in old Kathmandu, a river of people flowing by little shops overflowing with bangles, colorful cloth and shining metalwares; still others will remember the small temples scattered along the streets, their brass portals glowing in the light of butter lamps.

For seven centuries, since the artistic flowering of the early Malla period, copper, brass, and bronze have been shaped into graceful forms of gods and goddesses, pounded into panels of animals and flowers, and cast into the simple vessels that shine in the warm, dark kitchens of Nepali homes.

In the bazaar street between Durbar Square and Asan Tol, generation-old shops sell fine metalwares made in Patan, or in Chainpur and Bhojpur in eastern Nepal. Most metalwares are new, and of consistently good quality. Quality and cost are determined by the proper mixing of metals, the casting, and the finishing.

Pure and proportionate mixtures for bronze and brass are difficult to assess by eye?the reputation of the metal worker is the best assurance. Unskilled casting leaves pits and thin spots. Each piece should be carefully examined for patches, which may discolor over time. Finishing, polishing, and the refinement of details like floral patterns and faces take a skilled hand and a lot of time. Compare different pieces, and you?ll soon be able to distinguish fine from crude quality.

Older pieces are found in the open market beside Durbar Square, in shops along Durbar Marg, and in Bhaktapur. A dark, venerable appearance doesn?t mean a piece is old. Feel the underside of the piece. It will be smooth with time and use, sharp if it?s new. To take pieces over one hundred years old out of the country, you must get permission from the Department of Archaeology. Many shops and shipping agencies will be glad to provide information and assistance.

Walk through the bazaar to Kel Tol, a small square where a little temple is festooned with red and black hair tassels and a wall of hats is on display. In a large courtyard, behind a Buddha statue on a carved pillar, is the temple of Seto Machhendranath, the deity of compassion. Wind through the diminutive chaityas up to the temple, where the richly-dressed deity sits in candlelight behind repouss? brass portals. Look up at the half-moon toranas above the doors, delicately beaten into flowers and beasts, and you will see raw holes in the metal where figures of the gods have been torn out. Some exquisite old metalwork is for sale in Kathmandu, but it is part of Nepal?s heritage and should not be exported. A few images are left on the toranas? a Tara holding a lotus, with a protective band of steel around her waist.

Outside in the bazaar, the metalwares travel (as they have for centuries) from shop to home and often to distant lands. In the Nepali home, there is a vast array of plates and pots and lamps, polished with woodash to a gentle luster. In every room and washing place, you will see the karuwa, a water pitcher with a stubby spout.

When the family sits down for their rice, the amkhora or water jar, will stand beside the round dal cups, called kachaura, and the beaten brass dinner plates. The amkhora and the kachaura are often decorated with ancient designs?medallions of Krishna, Buddha, or peacocks set in elaborate floral patterns.

On religious and formal occasions, raksi or Nepali wine flows in many homes. Guests are served raksi in small, finely worked wine cups from the anti, a tall decanter with a long curving spout and a metal lid adorned with a bird. At some wedding feasts, the grace of the shy bride is tested before the husband?s family?lifting the anti high in the air, she must pour wine into the tiny cups, not spilling a drop.

In casual times, local beer called chang is drunk from the heavy ?singing bowl,? found in every metal shop and souvenir stand. Many are from Assam, and despite their festive use, their delightful sound has brought them to the quiet rooms of countless Western meditators.

In the kitchen, where metalwares have changed little in hundreds of years, the paradigm of simple, graceful design is the traditional round-bottomed rice pot. A unique variation is the kan baddhu or ?ear pot,? a heavy vessel with two large metal loops or ears at its rim and a large loop on its lid. The handle of a brass ladle is slipped through the loops and twisted. The lid is firmly closed?a Nepali pressure cooker.

Though its temple may be on a distant hillside, the family?s personal deity also has a home at the family altar, in the kitchen or the pantry room. Here, in daily puja, they offer food, water, flowers, and colored powders to their deity. The gods? and goddesses? vessels are often small versions of household wares tiny karuwas and antis for pouring water or wine.

Light is offered in minute brass butter lamps or in elaborate sukundas. The sukunda is a composite piece, a shallow lamp-dish attached to a sacred oil pot. Five serpent deities rise behind the oil pot like a hand. Behind the lamp is a figure of Ganesh, the elephant-headed god. A little stand with two or three coin-sized cups holds vermilion and other colored powders, and a fine beaten copper dish, perhaps made by the Tamrakars of Patan, holds rice, sweets, and flowers.

In Nepal, gods and humans, beauty and utility mingle freely. For seven hundred years, metals from these hills have travelled to China, India, and Tibet. In a month or two, perhaps you like the medieval Chinese pilgrim, will arrive at your home, open your satchel, and present your family with a fine anti or amkhora, cast in the workshops of Patan or the cottages of Chainpur. And years from now, that piece will bring to life your vision of Nepal.


source : nepal traveller

Offline treebell23

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Re: Metal Craft
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2012, 01:24:14 PM »
Each piece should be carefully examined for patches, which may discolor over time. Finishing, polishing, and the refinement of details like floral patterns and faces take a skilled hand and a lot of time. Compare different pieces, and you?ll soon be able to distinguish fine from crude quality.

Offline delroy.deitra

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« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2012, 04:48:24 PM »
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