Author Topic: Deepankha Yatra: The Great Peace March: Nepal-History  (Read 1263 times)

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Offline soiamd

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Deepankha Yatra: The Great Peace March: Nepal-History
« on: August 18, 2008, 09:39:54 PM »
By Laxmi Bahadur Vaidya
Deepankha Yatra takes place when the five auspicious astronomical features happen to be together on a day. The day must be the Full Moon day of the month of Aswin. Again it must occur on Sunday with Harshana astronomical sign and the day must have a lunar eclipse.

The legend behind this most religious, cultural and social march is that on this very day Deepanker Buddha with his spiritual power brought life to an idol of blue-horned bull (Neel Thu). Once Shankaracharya, in disguise, visited the Yogamber temple at Basuvarna Mahavihar. He came to know about the mysterious matter of the blue-horned bull, which had possessed an extraordinary power. Then Shankaracharya was seeking an opportunity to take away the bull from the Yogamber temple. One day he got the chance and took away the bull secretly from the temple where it was safeguarded at Nagbahal just behind the golden temple of the Hiranya Varna Mahavihar. With spiritual powers the priests of the Vihara tried their best to return back the blue-horned bull but Shankaracharya countered it. Consequently, the bull was confused and lost its route for three months. In this three month?s period the bull wandered hither and thither visited various places and ultimately reached to Nagbahal and petrified into a stone-bull.
Mysteriously, the day was the Full Moon day of Aswin month (September-October) on Sunday with Harshana astrological feature having lunar eclipse. Regarding that day is a very sacred and auspicious one; the local inhabitants worshipped the blue-horned calf with great reverence as an incarnation of the Bodhisattwa. From this very day the peculiar traditional system of worshipping the bull at Itilahne (Nagbahal) in Lalitpur became an important religious event.

Nagbahal is one of the important religious sites of Buddhists. It is rich in historical, architectural and cultural heritage with age-old rituals. On the east of the Nagbahal, there is Hiranya Varna Mahavihar, which is renowned as the golden temple in the world.

Nagbahal approximately spread to six ropanis of land. It is a wide and open Bahal with stone spouts from where pure water trickles down. It is also called Itilahne. But it is widely known as Nagbahal due to two images of the serpents or Nagas named Basuki and Champak, which are painted on the wall in the eastern side of the sacred Vihar. Two images of the Bodhisatwa can also be found in the same site where the stone spouts exist. To enter the Vihar there are three gates in the east, north and south directions. The main gate that is constructed in an attractive architectural design lies in the southeast corner of the Vihar. It is a sacred place where the statue of the legendary blue-horned bull is erected on the pedestal of the bricks facing towards the east. All sides of the statue of the bull are surrounded by iron fence. Above the statue there is a canopy made of brass and a roof with gilded spire .

On the right of the bull there is a beautiful garden. In the middle of the garden a beautiful two storey-Vihar called Basu Varna Mahavihar is constructed. There an attractive statue of the Shakya Muni Buddha can be seen. Around the Vihara there are a number ancient Chaityas including three of the Lichhavi period with different designs and styles stand.

Deepankha?yatra commemorates the blue-horned calf?s salvation and also traces its journey back to its home. It became a very popular religious march of worshipping all the gods and goddesses visiting 130 temples and monasteries of religious significance on the 60 km long route around the Kathmandu valley calling for peace and religious harmony among different religious denominations. The ninth edition of Deepankha-yatra was observed after 38 years five months ago. The last procession that took place in 1967 was believed to have participated by some 17,000 devotees.

The ninth Deepankha-yatra was observed in the Kathmandu valley. More than one lakh Buddhist and Hindu devotees of all ages had participated in the procession. The march had begun at around quarter past three in the morning from Nagbahal in Lalitpur. Headed by three Buddhist priests the participants visited 130 Buddhist and Hindu temples in Kathmandu and Lalitpur.

The procession was moved on to Mangal Bazaar, Tangal, Bungamati, Khokana, Jal Vinayak, Chovar, Teku, Tankeswar, Maru, Sitapaila, Ichangu Narayan, Swayambhu, Chhetrapati, Thamel, Naxal, Chabahil and Boudha. After a brief rest at Boudha, the march resumed and the next morning, it reached Lagankhel, the last leg of the journey. Thus the great procession of Deepankha-yatra ended. It is widely believed participation in the procession is equal to donating a tola of gold.

on that occasion devotees offered a combination of nine different grains as a symbol of nine planets, money as well as small idols of bull made out of copper or brass to deities and prayed for the welfare of all living beings. The festival has its own significance as it intends to spread the message of peace, harmony and religious tolerance among all religious communities. Nowhere can be found such a strange and peacefully coexisting religious tradition in the world.

Offline Eastern Media Solution

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Re: Deepankha Yatra: The Great Peace March: Nepal-History
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2008, 09:56:01 PM »
yo ra tyo nawomi ustai ho ki kya ho ?
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Offline r0ttener

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Re: Deepankha Yatra: The Great Peace March: Nepal-History
« Reply #2 on: August 19, 2008, 04:51:40 AM »
i liked this post very much.

I think there's one more thing that should be there before Dipankha yatra takes place. I heard that the local people or the Buddhist priest at Nagbahal have to hear the sound of bull bellowing. Then only it's the complete sign for Dipankha yatra otherwise, the mentioned astronomical features are worthless or meaningless. I don't know how much it is true. But i believe that's the fact because one of the old man shared it with me and other people.

For your kind information, i was also a participant of the last Dipankha yatra occurred about 2 or 3 yrs earlier. But i couldn't complete it and halted at Boudha.

And i would also like to inform what i saw. Some of the devotees resumed their journey from the break at Boudha before the leader of the mass ie. the Buddhist priest, and it is not allowed or it's wrong. I don't know what caused this, lack of information or rush of enthusiasm. In the night, the people were found skipping the queue, the ones who came earlier got to start last while the ones who came later jumped the queue. Is this the true devotion?


Offline soiamd

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Re: Deepankha Yatra: The Great Peace March: Nepal-History
« Reply #3 on: August 19, 2008, 08:04:10 AM »
ya sahi kura ho that was too long journey ani saaab le pura garna sakdai sakdiana ni tyatro ved lai maanage garnu t hulo kura ho
ani baudha maa tyaha rest theyo tyaha bata hidera pauspati hudai koteshowr hudai chyasal hudai lagankhel pugna parne theyo bato.

tara aba naskne haru le beech maa nai bus or others means bata lalitpur ayeko payeko theye. so tyhi vayera ho tara infact tyasto jatra sayad aba hami le kaile dekuna paune chainau hola

 


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