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Offline dYnasTy

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Legends of Cricket
« on: May 10, 2010, 07:23:42 PM »


Sir Donald Bradman
Sir Donald Bradman (1908 - 2001)
The Australian cricketer Don Bradman is acknowledged as the greatest cricketer of all time. To prove this accolade one has only to look at his test batting average of 99.94. Playing a style of attacking cricket he drew many fans and piled many runs. So successful was he that when England faced Australia during the times of the great depression a special tactic was created just to counter his finesse. This was known as 'Bodyline' where full length balls were delivered to the body of the batsman in hope of deflections to the leg side. This tactic was later outlawed. He also holds many test records including that for most double and triple centuries (12).

Introduction

If anyone is synonymous with the sport of cricket, it’s Sir Donald Bradman. Over the course of two decades, ‘The Don’ (as he was reverentially known) changed the face of the game with his truly awesome performances at international and domestic levels for Australia.

A beacon of hope for many during the desperate years of the Great Depression, a captain of arguably the greatest side sport has ever known, and a perennial thorn in the side of literally every bowler he faced, The Don’s significance transcended mere sport and continues to penetrate the mentalities of Australians today. Immortalised in songs like ‘Sir Don’, associated with no fewer than five landmarks in Australia (including the central thoroughfare in Adelaide, now known as Sir Donald Bradman Drive), even the face of the Australian 20c coin, his status is near mythical.

It is easy to see why. No fewer than 29 centuries and 13 half-centuries in 52 Test matches, amounting to 6996 runs, gave Bradman the staggering batting average of 99.94. What makes this even more awesome is Bradman’s consistency at domestic level, with a batting average of 95.14 across 234 matches for New South Wales and then South Australia, including 117 centuries. His top score of 334 was a then-world record and, to this day, Australians are loath to surpass The Don, most notably Mark Taylor, who declared on 334 not out rather than top Bradman. For all this and more, Bradman’s status is simply incomparable and, as long as cricket is played, Bradman will be at the forefront.

Career overview

Early Years

Born on August 27th 1908 in Cootamundra in New South Wales, Bradman’s early development was a testament to the virtues of practice, practice, and more practice. During his youth, he would spend hours each day with a stump and a golf ball, hitting the latter against a water tank on a rounded stand, which would provide variation in pace and trajectory. Needless to say, his efforts singled him out as the school’s cricket star and he had made his first century by the age of 12.

Showing his precocity, Bradman was playing bush cricket at the age of just 13, stepping in for his local Bowral team while acting as scorer and making 37 not out. After a brief flirtation with tennis, Bradman resumed his cricket career and made immense strides, consistently dominating opposition bowling attacks on cricket pitches, even to the point of notching up triple centuries.

It was little surprise, therefore, that his exploits attracted attention and Bradman soon moved up to grade cricket in Sydney for St. George, again excelling. By the 1927/1928 season, the young Don had been selected for the New South Wales side at just 19 years old, and all while juggling a real estate job too! His first-class debut was naturally brilliant, scoring a century, and he continued to impress for the side throughout the season, although missed out on selection for the Australian squad.

However, after moving to Sydney the following season, Bradman took advantage of the opportunity to face the touring England side and launched his first assault on their bowlers. After pulverising his way to 87 and 132 not out, he moved up to Test level with Australia.

The rise of The Don

Unlike his first class debut, Bradman’s first Test outing was surprising insofar as it bucked the trend of his career. Caught on a sticky wicked, the Australians were devastated by the English in Brisbane and Bradman immediately found himself out of the side.

The following match, Bradman returned and service was resumed, as he became the youngest player to make a Test century, smashing 112 in the second innings. Although Australia lost the series to England, Bradman continued to impress both at Test and domestic level and was duly selected for the return tour to England in 1930. Up against the Ashes holders, Bradman opened his account on English pitches with a blistering 236 in Worcester. This set the trend for the entire tour, with his performances galvanising the Australians to a famous victory


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Offline NEWROAD

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2010, 01:27:31 AM »
THANK YOU FOR SHARING THIS ....DO YOU KNOW,WHY HIS TEST BATTING AVERAGE IS NOT 100%? ???
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Offline dYnasTy

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2010, 07:23:05 AM »
HIs test average uld have been 100% if he could score 4 runs in his last test ... unfortunately he was out for duck...bad luck
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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2010, 08:16:01 AM »
YEP! THAT'S RIGHT. :pani
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Offline dYnasTy

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #4 on: May 12, 2010, 05:52:24 PM »






                                                    Sir Vivian Richards (1952 - ....)
                                                      West Indies

Richards made his Test match debut for the West Indian cricket team in 1974 against India in Bangalore. He made an unbeaten 192 in the second Test of the same series in New Delhi. The West Indies saw him as a strong opener and he kept his profile up in the early years of his promising career.
In his Test career, he scored 8,540 runs in 121 Test matches at an average of 50.23 (including 24 centuries). Richards also scored 5 centuries in World Series Cricket between 1977–79. These are not recognised by the ICC as "official" Test centuries, but the high standard of cricket played in this series means that they can arguably be ranked alongside his 24 Test centuries. Richards won 27 of 50 matches as a Test captain, and lost only 8. He is also the scorer of the fastest-ever Test century, from just 56 balls against England in Antigua during the 1986 tour. He hit 84 sixes in Test cricket. His highest innings of 291 is sixth on the list of West Indies' highest individual scores.
In 1975 Richards helped the West Indies to win the inaugural Cricket World Cup, a feat he later described as the most memorable of his career.[citation needed] He starred in the field, running out Alan Turner, Ian Chappell and Greg Chappell. The West Indies were again able to win the following World Cup in 1979, thanks to a Richards century in the final at Lord's, and Richards believes that on both occasions, despite internal island divisions, the Caribbean came together.[22]. He was until 2005 the only man to score a century and take 5 wickets in the same one-day international, against New Zealand at Dunedin in 1986–87. He rescued his side from a perilous position at Old Trafford in 1984 and, in partnership with Michael Holding, smashed 189 to win the game off his own bat.
1976 was perhaps Richards' finest year: he scored 1710 runs, at an astonishing average of 90.00, with seven centuries in 11 Tests. This achievement is all the more remarkable considering he missed the second Test at Lord's after contracting glandular fever; yet he returned to score his career-best 291 at the Oval later in the summer. This tally stood as the world record for most Test runs by a batsman in a single calendar year for 30 years until broken by Mohammad Yousuf of Pakistan on November 30, 2006.
Richards captained the West Indies in fifty Test matches from 1984–1991. He is the only West Indies captain never to lose a Test series, and it is said that his fierce will to win contributed to this achievement. His captaincy was, however, not without controversy: one incident was his aggressive, "finger-flapping" appeal leading to the incorrect dismissal of England batsman Rob Bailey in the Barbados Test in 1990, which was described by Wisden as "at best undignified and unsightly. At worst, it was calculated gamesmanship" [23]. This behaviour would nowadays be penalised according to Section 2.5. of the Rules of Conduct of the ICC Code of Conduct
« Last Edit: May 12, 2010, 05:56:56 PM by SumaNiL »
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Offline dYnasTy

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2010, 08:27:27 AM »





Wasim Akram
Wasim Akram (Punjabi, Urdu: وسیم اکرم; born 3 June 1966 in Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan) is a former Pakistani left arm fast bowler and left handed batsman in cricket, who represented the Pakistan national cricket team in Test cricket and One Day International matches.
Akram is regarded as one of the best fast bowlers in cricket. He holds the world record for most wickets in List A cricket with 881 and is second only to Sri Lankan off-spin bowler, Muttiah Muralitharan in terms of One Day International wickets with 502. He is considered to be one of the founders and perhaps the finest exponent of reverse swing bowling.[1][2][3] The revolutionary nature of reverse swing initially resulted in accusations of ball tampering, although reverse swing has now been accepted as a legitimate feature of the game. Akram's later career was also tarnished with accusations of match fixing, although these remain unproven.
On 30 September 2009, Akram was one of five new members inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.

Test cricket

Akram made his Test cricket debut for Pakistan against New Zealand in 1985 and in only his second Test match, he achieved 10 wickets in the match. A few weeks prior to his selection into the Pakistan team, he was an unknown club cricketer who had failed to even make it to his college team. He came to the trials at Qaddafi Stadium Lahore, but for the first two days he did not get a chance to bowl. On the third day he got the chance and the observers around him saw the potential and was spotted by Javed Miandad and as a result of his insisting was it that Akram was given an opportunity to play for Pakistan. Later that season he opened the bowling attack with Imran Khan, who became his teacher at the World Championship of Cricket in Australia.
In the 1987 Cricket World Cup, when Pakistan played against the West Indies, Akram bowled to Viv Richards in the late overs of the innings but Richards, who is regarded as the best batsman during that period, struggled against Akram's bowling performances.
Akram's rise in international cricket was rapid during the initial years. When Pakistan toured the West Indies in 1988, he looked to be the quickest bowler between the two sides. However, a groin injury impeded his career in the late 1980s. Following two surgeries, he re-emerged in the 1990s as a fast bowler who focused more on swing and accurate bowling.

One Day International

Akram was a significant figure in the 1992 Cricket World Cup held in Australia, when Pakistan won the tournament. In the final against England, his batting performance during his innings of 33 runs off 19 balls, pushed Pakistan to a respectable score of 249 for 6. Akram then took the important wicket of Ian Botham early on and when brought back into the attack later on, with the ball reverse swinging, he produced a devastating spell of bowling which led to Allan Lamb and Chris Lewis being bowled in successive deliveries in one over. His excellent performances earned him the Man of the Match award for the final.[6][7]
He also captained Pakistan with some success. The high points of his captaincy was the 1996-1997 victory in the World Series Cricket in Australia, two Test match wins in India in 1998-1999 and in 1999, when Pakistan reached the 1999 Cricket World Cup final. The low point was the 1996 Cricket World Cup in Pakistan and India, when he had to pull out of the quarter final match against India, citing injury. After Pakistan's defeat, there were angry protests outside his home and riots across the country from angry fans who accused the team of throwing the match and a government inquiry was launched into the failure.
In 1999, he led Pakistan to the brink of victory in the World Cup before they capitulated and was defeated by Australia in the final by eight wickets with almost 30 overs to spare. This was the start of the match-fixing controversies, as people believed Akram had set up the match for Australia. However, none of the allegations could be proved.
He was Pakistan's best bowler in the 2003 Cricket World Cup taking 19 wickets in 7 matches. However, Pakistan failed to reach the "Super Six" phase of the tournament and Akram was one of the eight players to be sacked by the Pakistan Cricket Board as a result.
Akram was diagnosed with diabetes at the peak of his career, but despite the initial psychological blow, he managed to regain his form and went on to produce fine cricketing performances. Since then he has actively sought to be involved in various awareness-raising campaigns for diabetes
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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2010, 09:45:10 AM »






                                                    Sir Vivian Richards (1952 - ....)
                                                      West Indies

Richards made his Test match debut for the West Indian cricket team in 1974 against India in Bangalore. He made an unbeaten 192 in the second Test of the same series in New Delhi. The West Indies saw him as a strong opener and he kept his profile up in the early years of his promising career.
In his Test career, he scored 8,540 runs in 121 Test matches at an average of 50.23 (including 24 centuries). Richards also scored 5 centuries in World Series Cricket between 1977–79. These are not recognised by the ICC as "official" Test centuries, but the high standard of cricket played in this series means that they can arguably be ranked alongside his 24 Test centuries. Richards won 27 of 50 matches as a Test captain, and lost only 8. He is also the scorer of the fastest-ever Test century, from just 56 balls against England in Antigua during the 1986 tour. He hit 84 sixes in Test cricket. His highest innings of 291 is sixth on the list of West Indies' highest individual scores.
In 1975 Richards helped the West Indies to win the inaugural Cricket World Cup, a feat he later described as the most memorable of his career.[citation needed] He starred in the field, running out Alan Turner, Ian Chappell and Greg Chappell. The West Indies were again able to win the following World Cup in 1979, thanks to a Richards century in the final at Lord's, and Richards believes that on both occasions, despite internal island divisions, the Caribbean came together.[22]. He was until 2005 the only man to score a century and take 5 wickets in the same one-day international, against New Zealand at Dunedin in 1986–87. He rescued his side from a perilous position at Old Trafford in 1984 and, in partnership with Michael Holding, smashed 189 to win the game off his own bat.
1976 was perhaps Richards' finest year: he scored 1710 runs, at an astonishing average of 90.00, with seven centuries in 11 Tests. This achievement is all the more remarkable considering he missed the second Test at Lord's after contracting glandular fever; yet he returned to score his career-best 291 at the Oval later in the summer. This tally stood as the world record for most Test runs by a batsman in a single calendar year for 30 years until broken by Mohammad Yousuf of Pakistan on November 30, 2006.
Richards captained the West Indies in fifty Test matches from 1984–1991. He is the only West Indies captain never to lose a Test series, and it is said that his fierce will to win contributed to this achievement. His captaincy was, however, not without controversy: one incident was his aggressive, "finger-flapping" appeal leading to the incorrect dismissal of England batsman Rob Bailey in the Barbados Test in 1990, which was described by Wisden as "at best undignified and unsightly. At worst, it was calculated gamesmanship" [23]. This behaviour would nowadays be penalised according to Section 2.5. of the Rules of Conduct of the ICC Code of Conduct

HE WAS A VERY GOOD BATSMAN OF HIS TIME RE K
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Offline dYnasTy

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2010, 07:55:25 PM »
thats the reason he's a legend
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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2010, 09:26:01 AM »





Wasim Akram
Wasim Akram (Punjabi, Urdu: وسیم اکرم; born 3 June 1966 in Lahore, Punjab, Pakistan) is a former Pakistani left arm fast bowler and left handed batsman in cricket, who represented the Pakistan national cricket team in Test cricket and One Day International matches.
Akram is regarded as one of the best fast bowlers in cricket. He holds the world record for most wickets in List A cricket with 881 and is second only to Sri Lankan off-spin bowler, Muttiah Muralitharan in terms of One Day International wickets with 502. He is considered to be one of the founders and perhaps the finest exponent of reverse swing bowling.[1][2][3] The revolutionary nature of reverse swing initially resulted in accusations of ball tampering, although reverse swing has now been accepted as a legitimate feature of the game. Akram's later career was also tarnished with accusations of match fixing, although these remain unproven.
On 30 September 2009, Akram was one of five new members inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame.

Test cricket

Akram made his Test cricket debut for Pakistan against New Zealand in 1985 and in only his second Test match, he achieved 10 wickets in the match. A few weeks prior to his selection into the Pakistan team, he was an unknown club cricketer who had failed to even make it to his college team. He came to the trials at Qaddafi Stadium Lahore, but for the first two days he did not get a chance to bowl. On the third day he got the chance and the observers around him saw the potential and was spotted by Javed Miandad and as a result of his insisting was it that Akram was given an opportunity to play for Pakistan. Later that season he opened the bowling attack with Imran Khan, who became his teacher at the World Championship of Cricket in Australia.
In the 1987 Cricket World Cup, when Pakistan played against the West Indies, Akram bowled to Viv Richards in the late overs of the innings but Richards, who is regarded as the best batsman during that period, struggled against Akram's bowling performances.
Akram's rise in international cricket was rapid during the initial years. When Pakistan toured the West Indies in 1988, he looked to be the quickest bowler between the two sides. However, a groin injury impeded his career in the late 1980s. Following two surgeries, he re-emerged in the 1990s as a fast bowler who focused more on swing and accurate bowling.

One Day International

Akram was a significant figure in the 1992 Cricket World Cup held in Australia, when Pakistan won the tournament. In the final against England, his batting performance during his innings of 33 runs off 19 balls, pushed Pakistan to a respectable score of 249 for 6. Akram then took the important wicket of Ian Botham early on and when brought back into the attack later on, with the ball reverse swinging, he produced a devastating spell of bowling which led to Allan Lamb and Chris Lewis being bowled in successive deliveries in one over. His excellent performances earned him the Man of the Match award for the final.[6][7]
He also captained Pakistan with some success. The high points of his captaincy was the 1996-1997 victory in the World Series Cricket in Australia, two Test match wins in India in 1998-1999 and in 1999, when Pakistan reached the 1999 Cricket World Cup final. The low point was the 1996 Cricket World Cup in Pakistan and India, when he had to pull out of the quarter final match against India, citing injury. After Pakistan's defeat, there were angry protests outside his home and riots across the country from angry fans who accused the team of throwing the match and a government inquiry was launched into the failure.
In 1999, he led Pakistan to the brink of victory in the World Cup before they capitulated and was defeated by Australia in the final by eight wickets with almost 30 overs to spare. This was the start of the match-fixing controversies, as people believed Akram had set up the match for Australia. However, none of the allegations could be proved.
He was Pakistan's best bowler in the 2003 Cricket World Cup taking 19 wickets in 7 matches. However, Pakistan failed to reach the "Super Six" phase of the tournament and Akram was one of the eight players to be sacked by the Pakistan Cricket Board as a result.
Akram was diagnosed with diabetes at the peak of his career, but despite the initial psychological blow, he managed to regain his form and went on to produce fine cricketing performances. Since then he has actively sought to be involved in various awareness-raising campaigns for diabetes

WASIM WAS THE ONE OF MY  ALL TIME FAV. FAST LEFT ARM FAST BOWLER OF HIS TIME . :good:
When I see you smile and know that it is not for me, that is when I will miss you the most.

Offline dYnasTy

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2010, 09:29:21 AM »
mero pani ...
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Offline deadalive

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #10 on: June 05, 2010, 01:58:31 AM »
m apachi timro.....sumanil...... :clap:

Offline Jahangir

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #11 on: July 02, 2010, 11:07:23 PM »
Cricket is really a great game to watch and to play also.No one knows who is the best player in Cricket. I mean there may be choice of every fans for every players.Some may love some players some may not love the same players.My best player is Kapil Dev from India. He is really known for his bowling skills all over the world and one must respect all the players too.So I don't have any unwanted players here in Cricket game.
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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2012, 04:19:26 PM »
Thanks for sharing such a nice post....

Offline robbywilson

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #13 on: July 10, 2012, 11:23:17 AM »
I am a big lover of cricket .....thanks for sharing such a nice post for us

Offline jamesmockery

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Re: Legends of Cricket
« Reply #14 on: August 06, 2012, 11:26:56 PM »
There are so many greatest player in cricket but according to my point of view sachin tendulker is a legends of cricket. He is a one of my favorite and greatest batsman in cricket. He is playing cricket since last 22 years. So he is a god of cricket.
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