Author Topic: Nepal One of the deadliest place to give birth  (Read 751 times)

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Offline NoBody

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Nepal One of the deadliest place to give birth
« on: March 08, 2007, 08:06:39 AM »
Superstition, lack of health facilities causes high maternal and neonatal mortality in Nepal

Dil Kumari Bhujel, 19, died due to failure to find medical help following complications delivering her first child.

In her remote village of Kuibhir VDC in Okhaladhunga District, women with pregnancy-related problems do not have access to skilled birth attendants, nor do they have access to health centers equipped with emergency obstetric care nearby.

So Dil's mother-in-law and female neighbors had little choice but to carry out the delivery themselves. However, due to a prolonged labor of over six hours, her baby had already died in the womb. Worried, the women, with little knowledge about safe delivery, tried to pull the baby out, but this ruptured her uterus, causing excessive bleeding.

In an effort to save her life, a few young men in the mountainous village carried her on a doka (a bamboo stretcher) and set out for the nearly five-hour walk to a hospital at Tekanpur in the district headquarters. Sadly, she breathed her last on her way to the hospital.

Dil Kumari is just a case in point. An estimated 5,000 to 6,000 women die in Nepal each year while delivering a child. Likewise, this war-torn Himalayan country records an annual 39 neonatal deaths and 64 child deaths per 1,000 live births, thanks to the irrational cultural beliefs and lack of health facilities and money required for treatment.

According to the World Disaster Report 2006 prepared by the International Federation of the Red Cross (IFRC), Nepal records a maternal death toll of one woman every 90 minutes, making Nepal the deadliest place in the world to give birth outside of Afghanistan and a few African countries.

Most mothers who lose their lives in childbirth in Nepal die from a lack emergency obstetric care or assistance from skilled birth attendants. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 71 percent of the country's maternal deaths are due to direct obstetric causes, most of which could be effectively managed or prevented. Forty-six percent of all maternal deaths result from post-partum hemorrhage, with nearly 3,000 women in Nepal bleeding to death every year.

Lack of skilled birth attendants and superstition has made the situation worse in Nepal. According to Demographic and Health Survey 2001, some 91 percent of the deliveries in Nepal take place at home, the great majority without any skilled medical help. Worse still, traditional Nepali society regards a woman as polluted and impure for the first 11 days after giving birth. Male relatives, including her own husband, cannot go near her, so the woman lives in isolated places like a cowshed or a makeshift hut. She is forced to sleep with her newborn on a cold floor in unhygienic conditions, increasing her chances of septicemia and risking the infant's health.

Likewise, the difficult topography and abject poverty among people in rural areas of the country are other important reasons behind such an astoundingly high rate of maternal and neonatal mortality. Nepal is a mountainous country where more than 31 percent people live below the absolute poverty line. Even if the poorest families decide to seek care, the barriers they face in getting the patient to a well-equipped health facility are considerable.

While access to healthcare facilities has given rise to maternal mortality rates, the practice of unsafe motherhood poses an equally serious threat to the newborns. Another, but important factor, compounding the problem is early marriage and unsafe abortion. Most people in rural areas hold the belief that they could go to heaven if they send off their daughters in marriage before their first menstruation. This leads to women giving birth at an early age and subsequently results in high rates of maternal and neonatal deaths.

The government officials, however, are not ready to accept the data provided by UNICEF and the WHO. Dr Babu Ram Marasini, deputy health administrator at the Health Ministry, claimed that the maternal mortality rate in the country has gone down by almost 50 percent compared to 10 years ago. He said that the data provided by UNICEF and WHO were just projections arrived at on the basis of other social indicators, and not on the basis of a study.

Marasini, referring to a preliminary Demographic Health Survey carried out by Department of Health Services last year, said the maternal mortality rate has been reduced to 280 per 100,000 live births, from 539 per 100,000 live births in 1996. The study, according to him, said that the Contraceptive Prevalence Rate (CPR) has considerably increased in Nepal in recent years. "This means women are conceiving fewer times, which automatically means less death," he said.
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Offline SOAD

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Re: Nepal One of the deadliest place to give birth
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2007, 06:39:37 PM »
Dherai fine assement!

Offline waxyhair856

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Re: Nepal One of the deadliest place to give birth
« Reply #2 on: September 11, 2012, 03:05:35 PM »
Most of underdeveloped countries has high maternal death rate. And part of these is that fact the Nepal is mostly a terrain country making it harder for mother to reach health centers or hospitals.

Offline paster

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awareness
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2012, 08:47:28 PM »
The program often didnít reach the poorest of poor women because of gaps in Indiaís basic health infrastructure and a top-down Wine giftsMKTy approach that resulted in a lot of well-meaning laws but not much work at the ground level increasing awareness and training poor communities to understand and deal with maternal emergencies.

Offline vinich32

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Re: Nepal One of the deadliest place to give birth
« Reply #4 on: November 18, 2012, 01:55:03 AM »
Season recap Setting the scene: This season began in the wake of the remarkable victory of the Los Angeles Lakers, who ended an agonizing ...


thanks for sharing.


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Offline Hannah

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Re: Nepal One of the deadliest place to give birth
« Reply #5 on: December 24, 2012, 08:53:13 PM »
The reason for the clean air could have been that there were very few cars, as seen in the photograph of New Road where the statue of Bir Shamsher read more on horseback was still standing.

 


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